Keep calm because I already knowCreating a classroom culture of inquiry is getting better and better every September in most ways. It’s especially working well to reassure the students with little previous physics experience, to excite the students with previous unpleasant experiences with physics, to challenge the students who found previous physics classes boring or stifling, and to empower students who’ve been marginalized by schooling in general. But one thing I’m still struggling with is responding well to the students who have been taught to uncritically regurgitate correct answers — and who’ve embraced it.

How do I get curious about their ideas?  My conflict mediation coach suggests finding out what need that meets, what they got from that experience that they’re not getting elsewhere.  I confess that I’m afraid to find out.  I’m also afraid of the effect they have on the other students.  Their dismissive insistence that other people’s theories are “wrong” can quickly undo weeks of carefully cultivating a spirit of exploring and evaluating the evidence ourselves; their pat answers to other people’s questions make it seem like it’s stupid to be curious at all.

I have a bunch of options here… one is an activity called “Thinking Like a Technician” where I introduce the idea that “believing” is different from provisionally accepting the theory best supported by the current evidence.  I show the Wikipedia page for atomic theory to draw out the idea that there are many models of the atom, that all of them are a little bit wrong, and that our job is to choose which one we need for which situations, rather than to figure out which one is right.  That seems to help a bit, and give us some points of reference to refer back to.

I show a video with Malcolm Longair and Michio Kaku explaining that atoms are made of mostly nothingness.  But I think it makes it worse.  The students who are excited get more excited; the ones who feel like I’m threatening the authority of the high school physics teachers they idolize get even angrier.  For the rest of the class, it’s wonderful — but for this subset, it’s uncomfortably close to Elicit-Confront-Resolve.  They experience it as a form of “expose-and-shame“, and unsurprisingly retaliate.  If they can’t find some idea of mine to expose and shame, they’ll turn on the other students.

Something I’m trying to improve: How do I help students re-evaluate things that seem solid?  It’s not just that they respond with defensiveness; they also tend to see the whole exercise of inquiry (or, as some people call it, “science”) as a waste of time.  What could make it worth re-examining the evidence when you’re that sure?